Page 2 of pictures from the SSWR Annual Meeting in New Orleans, January 2009. Eric Hadley-Ives

This is the second page of photos from New Orleans. Page One is here. Or go to my blog.

Ron Thompson Curtis Big Chief Fi-Yi-Yi by Victor Harris

Ron G. Thompson, Jr. looks up from his table to chat with Dean Edward Lawlor. Ron and I were doctoral students at GWB at the same time.

Curtis McMillen and Ron Thompson chat while waiting for lunch at the SSWR conference.

A suit by Victor Harris. This was for the big chief of the Fi-Yi-Yi.

Huei-Wern Shen Qiaobing Wu with a pile of cash FiYiYi suites at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Huei-Wern Shen is posing with a cash grant she has received for researching the influence of huge piles of money on doctoral students.

Qiaobing Wu examines a huge pile of cash created by the artist Srdjan Loncar (the installation is titled Value)

Click on the image above to see the larger display of suits by Victor Harris for the Fi-Yi-Yi Tribe.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

Here I am enjoying this untitled installation by Beatriz Milhazes.

Qiaobing Wu is also admiring Beatriz Milhazes' work.

A fun room in the Old Mint in New Orleans. This used to be a prison.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Huei-Wern Shen Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

St. Louis Cathedral in New Orleans, with General Jackson (later President) riding a horse in front.

Here is Huei-Wern Shen's photograph of me in Jackson Square in front of the St. Louis Cathedral in New Orleans.

This is a view looking down Chartres Street (looking southwest, toward downtown and Canal Street).

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

This is the statue of Joan of Arc presented to New Orleans in 1958 by Charles de Gaulle, but not actually put up until years later after de Gaulle found French citizens who would pay the cost of putting it up.

The statue is a copy of one made in 1880 by Emmanuel Fremiet. It now stands on Decatur Street.

Close-up of the architectural details on the Johns-Manville Building at 224 Magazine (built in 1914). I noticed this every time I walked between the conference hotel and my hotel.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

I like this view of a tree and a home with iron balconies, as these are two characteristics of New Orleans. This is on Esplanade Avenue.

Here is a view in City Park in New Orleans.

The main lobby area of my hotel, the Country Inn and Suites, which was very much less expensive than the SSWR meeting hotel.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

This was a decoration at the reception for some Louisiana Social Work schools. It is also an advertisement for mood-stabilizing medications.

I liked this statue's costume, but I was sorry that I didn't see any people dressed this way. Mardi Gras was a month away.

I pretty much lived off reception food David Hodge treated me to a Po-Boy sandwich and I passed the favor on to a worthy doctoral student.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

These were hot treats available during a poster session.

These are Crawfish Pies.

These are Andouille Sausage pastries.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

Here is the Johnny's Po-Boy Restaurant where I took my lunch on two days. The food was inexpensive. I won't say it was good, but it wasn't bad either.

This is a close-up of a crabcake po-boy sandwich I split with another scholar for lunch on Sunday. The crabcakes in it were pretty good.

This is a gator po-boy that Qiaobing and her husband had for lunch on Sunday. That's what alligator meat looks like.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

Here Huei-Wern Shen (originally from Tainan) waits in Johnny's Po-Boy for her lunch. I suppose she was enjoying the crowded quarters and the general bustle of the place.

Here Qiaobing's gallant husband brings the gator po-boy to our table where we waited for my crab cake po-boy to be finished. He had recently earned a doctorate in psychology. This was not his celebratory lunch, although he looks happy enough.

Qiaobing Wu was probably wondering what the gator po-boy would taste like. She had never eaten alligator before.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

Qiaobing and Huei-Wern sit in Jackson Park where we enjoyed a picnic lunch together sitting on a bench. It had rained earlier and the ground was too wet for a more traditional seating arrangement.

Here we are enjoying our giant sandwiches in Jackson Park. Some acrobats were performing nearby, but we were content to gaze toward the cathedral and talk amongst ourselves as we ate our lunches.

This is a scene in the French Market on Decatur Street. Huei-Wern is walking along, and Qiaobing and her husband are looking at the alligator heads for sale at the end stall. No, they didn't buy one.

A photograph taken in January 2009 in New Orleans Photograph taken by Eric Hadley-Ives Photograph taken during my 2009 visit to New Orleans for the SSWR annual meeting

A display at a stall in the New Orleans French Market. If you click on the picture to see the larger image you might be able to see some alligator heads on the pile of merchandise for sale near these feather boas.

For me, this was one of the most memorable paintings I saw in the New Orleans Museum of Art. It's an extremely realistic portrait of an elderly German woman made by Karl Kronberger. My direct maternal ancestors came from Germany, and this woman reminded me of my German ancestors.

This was the last photograph I took in New Orleans. It's a mural in the Louis Armstrong airport. Lovely, isn't it? I took public transportation (busses) to and from the airport, and that worked pretty well for me.


That's all for this page.

To go to page 1, click here.

To see other images from a social work conference (a 2007 meeting in Hong Kong) click here.
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To see other pictures, click here.